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Testimonials regarding livestock and Pets:
Horses, Dairy Cattle, Beef Cattle, Goats, Zoo animals, Pigs, Dogs and Poultry 
 
Data from: Internet sources



"WHY FOOD GRADE OVER FEED GRADE?"
The purity of Diatomaceous Earth (DE) becomes more important when used as a scour prevention (especially among calves).  The purer the product, the less risk the calves will go back to eating black dirt.  The purpose of providing DE free choice to calves is to prevent them from returning to black dirt.  Why Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth?  Well the answer lies in that about 60% of the earth's crust is Silicon Dioxide (also known as Silica).  It is in the form of crystalline silica such as rocks, clays quartz (sand) soil and precious stones.  Black dirt contains a crystalline type Silicon Dioxide.  Unfortunately, the barnyard variety is contaminated with disease, organisms, bacteria and parasites that can be life threatening for newborn calves and causes parasites and health problems in adults.  DE will stop scours. Animals instinctively seek for missing nutrients, but when they are supplied (as with Diatomaceous Earth and its over 98% silica), they stop searching.
Jakers_with_hat.jpgResults of Codex Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth Fed to Horses:
Four Winds Stables, Robert D. Horkman, Orlando Florida.
Results of feeding 5 ounces of D.E. to show horses for a period of one year. 
Healthier looking animals with a definite sheen to their coat, absence of internal parasites, better feed conversion, reductions in manure odor, fly control, cured scours in cases where other medications had failed and improved appetites in "picky-eaters"


REPORT ON FEEDING CODEX FOOD-GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH TO
WALKING HORSES,Leslie "Shorty" Thomas, L. Frank Roper Stables, Winter Park, FL. - "I take pride in the appearance and health of the horses under my care, which have won many national awards against stiff competition... I am grateful to have found Fossil Shell Flour ... It stopped scours, noticeably reduced flies, increased appetites, better feed conversion, eliminated internal parasites and created a healthier appearance. I would definitely recommend this product to other horsemen". With horses fed approximately 5 ounces of diatomaceous earth mixed into the
feed twice daily, the following results were observed:
1. Stopped scours even on horses that had not responded to any other
medications.
2. Noticeable fly reduction.
3. Horses showed an increase in appetites.
4. Weight gain due to better-feed conversion.
5. Reduction in manure odor.
6. Elimination of any internal parasites.
7. Healthier appearance.

Capital South Syndicate by Dan Miller, manager.- Feeding Diatomaceous Earth to my show and race horses, stallions, mares, foals and horses in training, we have seen improvements in their hair coat and their attitude. Flies and parasites are less of a problem.


pig.jpgSTUDY OF CODEX FOOD-GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH IN FEEDER
PIGS, M. F. Petty, D.V.M., Alabama.
1. No internal parasites were discovered in the test group at any time after seven
days.
2. All hogs on DE stopped rooting and destroying the wooden feeder after ten
days.
3. By the end of the third week the odor of the test group was noticeably less
offensive than the control group.
4. By the end of six weeks the fly population decreased markedly


chicken.jpgRESULTS OF THE USE OF CODEX FOOD-GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH
WITH POULTRY, C.S. Mangen, D.V.M., San Diego, California.
Using two groups of birds with each group consisting of 8,000 white leghorn
caged layers in their pullet year, which had been producing for five months. The
test group was given 60 lbs. of diatomaceous earth per 1 ˝ tons of standard mixed
feed (17% protein) for 2 ˝ months. The following results were observed:
1. There appeared to be fewer flies around test group.
2. Droppings were of a drier consistency, making for easier cleaning of the
houses.
3. Seventy-five percent less deaths in the test group.
4. A two to four case-per-day increase in egg production by the test group
compared to the controlled group.

The following reports establish the virtues of Diatomaceous Earth as a parasitical, a digestive aid, and a container of trace mineral.

doggy.jpgCLINICAL OBSERVATIONS OF FEEDING CODEX FOOD-GRADE
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH TO DOGS
O.C. Collins, DVM, Midland Animal Clinic and Hospital,
Midland, Texas
In clinical observations of feeding dogs over 35 lbs. 1 tablespoon/day, and dogs under 35 lbs. 1 teaspoon/day, of diatomaceous earth, within seven days all ova disappeared from stools. Diatomaceous Earth controlled Ascarids (Toxocana), Hookworms (Anclyostoma caninum), and Whipworms (Trichuris vulipis).

giraffe.jpgFIELD REPORT ON EXPERIMENTAL FEEDING OF CODEX FOOD-GRADE
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH TO ZOO ANIMALS
Richard Smith, Hallwood Inc., Animal Food Specialties,
Grand Rapids, Michigan
A mixture of feed incorporating 2% diatomaceous earth was sent to three zoos for evaluation. John Ball Park of Grand Rapids, Michigan; Brookfield Zoos of Chicago, Illinois; and Buffalo Zoo of Buffalo, New York. John Ball and Buffalo Zoos reported that their black bears on the special feed showed a better coat and clearer eyes. The primates fed at the Brookfield Zoo displayed a pronounced improvement in both appearance and behavior. Stool samples taken at all three zoos showed an absence of any internal parasites - adult or egg. Parasites in these animals were present prior to using the diatomaceous earth food mixture.

dairycow.jpgFIELD REPORT - FEEDING CODEX FOOD-GRADE DIATOMACEOUS EARTH (DE)
TO DAIRY COWS
J. S. Bunker, Bunker Farms,
Mesa, Arizona
After feeding 100 dairy cows on diatomaceous earth for approximately one year, the following results were noted: warbles became non-existent; odors were almost completely gone; cows have better hair and coat condition and have no desire to lick soil as in the past; vet bills have been significantly reduced; butterfat content has risen from 503 lbs. per cow to 513 lbs. per cow.


FIELD REPORT – FEEDING DIATOMACEOUS
EARTH TO DAIRY COWS, Daniel M. Brandt, McFarland, Wisconsin.
Results from feeding 5 to 6 ounces of food-grade diatomaceous earth to dairy
herd for a period of five weeks. Butterfat tests have shown an increase of 3.7 to
3.9 percent. Mastitis had been quite a sever problem, came under control (no new
cases). Cows are brighter and healthier in appearance and milk production has
increased without an appreciable increase in feed.

FIELD REPORT – FREE CHOICE FEEDING TO DAIRY CATTLE, Dairy Herd
Association Improvement Program, Hussey Farms, Litchfield Park, Arizona.
Tests run on purebred Jersey dairy cows given free choice access to codex foodgrade
diatomaceous earth (DE). Average intake was three ounces per cow per
day. After six months the following results were observed:
Milk production in the test group increased over 20% with butterfat content
remaining the same. Warbles problems came to an abrupt halt, feed assimilation
improved, and fly problems were brought under control.

ORGAN ANALYSIS OF DAIRY COWS, Michigan Department of Agriculture,
Laboratory Division, Lansing, Michigan
Upon pathological examination of the organs of dairy cows having been given
free-choice feeding of codex food-grade diatomaceous earth for a period of
approximately five years, no visible organ abnormalities were observed.

REPORT ON POSSIBLE HAZARDS OF FEEDING CODEX FOOD-GRADE
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH TO DAIRY CATTLE, University of Illinois, College of
veterinary medicine.
When a 2% ration of codex food-grade diatomaceous earth was incorporated into
the feed of dairy cattle, there was no evidence of absorption nor did any residue of
the product appear in the milk.

FIELD TEST/STEER FEEDING EXPERIMENT USING CODEX FOOD-GRADE
DIATOMACEOUS EARTH, G.L. Maddox, Northside Hay Mill & Trading
Company, Glendale, Arizona.
CONTROL DE
Average purchase weight/head 650.2 lbs 686.8 lbs
Average out weight/head 846.7 lbs 945.6 lbs
Average gain/head 196.5 lbs 258.8 lbs
Average gain/head/day 2.3 lbs 2.8 lbs
Pounds feed/ pounds gain 9.8 lbs 8.2 lbs
Average cost/ pounds gain $ .243 $ .215
In all instances the diatomaceous earth test group gained more weight per steer,
on less feed than the control lot.

American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists



goats.jpg IS THERE ANY EFFECT BY DIETARY DIATOMACEOUS EARTH IN THE CONTROL OF GASTROINTESTINAL NEMATODES?



L:NUTI1, B. JOHNSON1, D. MCWHINNEY1, N. ELSAYED2, J. THOMPSON2, T. CRAIG*2 1INTERNATIONAL DAIRY GOAT CENTER, PRAIRIE VIEW A&M UNIVERSITY, PRAIRIE VIEW, TX 2COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE STATION, TX, USA

A pasture trial was run using 79 pregnant/lactating goats of four different breeds. The pastures had been grazed by the combined flock prior to the beginning of the trial and all of the does were treated with oral Ivermectin at a dose averaging 0.4 mg/kg during the preparturient phase of gestation. The does were blocked by breed and randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. The treatment group was then confined to a single pasture for the duration of the trial. The 16 week trial began during the first week of March 1999. The does had begun kidding in early February and continued until mid April. All does produced one or more kids. All goats were fed 1.36 kg/head/day of a 12% protein concentrate in addition to access to the pasture. The feed was placed in three troughs/pasture. The treatment groups were 1) no treatment, 2) 0.4 mg/kg oral Ivermectin at weeks 1,4 and 7, 3) 0.4 mg/kg oral Ivermectin at week 1, plus diatomaceous earths (DE) (Agrisafe Corp) in the concentrate, and 4) DE in concentrate. Weekly fecal examinations and hematocrits were taken from each doe. If an individual doe’s packed red cell value (per) fell to less than 20, or the McMaster egg count was greater than 4,000 stronglyloid eggs per gram (EPG) the doe was treated with 0.4 mg/kg Ivermectin the following week and was considered to be a non-survivor. No differences were detected among the treatment groups based on egg counts or packed cell volumes. However, the estimated survival of individuals (maintained PCV>20 or EPG <4000) in any of the treatment groups (2, 3 and 4) was statistically greater than for the control group. After the initial few weeks of the trial, it became obvious that Ivermectin was only marginally effective in lowering nematode egg counts. Haemonchus was the only genus seen by copro culture. The survival rate on the Boer goats was higher than other breeds across treatments. Feeding DE at 2.5% of the concentrate ration was equal to a marginally effective anthelmintic in controlling parasitic disease.

Source data www.shadowridgedonkeys.com

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